Essential Travel First Aid Kit

Posted on Feb 19, 2015 in Getting Prepared, Packing, Planning
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Whilst you really don’t want your child to be ill when on holiday it is far better to prepare for the worst and not need anything than to go unprepared and find yourself in a bit of a panic.  A basic first aid kit should be one of your (many!) priorities when you are packing for your family vacation.

There may be possible vaccinations that are recommended for the whole family too, depending on where you’re going, so make sure you check these well in advance of your travel dates; some courses can take several weeks to become effective, and several injections may be necessary for full protection.

When it comes down to getting ready to go, this helpful checklist should make sure that you remember all the essentials.  If you do forget anything though, don’t panic – it is usually very easy to buy most basic first aid essentials from a pharmacy when you are away.  Just make sure you get them in ready, rather than waiting to see if you need them.  You can bet that the one thing you don’t have will be the one thing that you end up needing … and usually when the pharmacies are closed or you are not near to any shopping areas.

Don’t forget the following:

  • Any prescription medications, with enough to last for the whole trip
  • Copies of any prescriptions can also be useful, in case the medication gets mislaid or damaged
  • Digital thermometer – if you think your child is running a temperature in the night it is better to check (and hopefully put your mind at ease) rather than worrying until the morning
  • Tweezers to remove splinters
  • Sun screen and after sun lotion
  • Plasters in different sizes
  • Antiseptic lotion or wipes
  • Antihistamines can be invaluable in cases of insect bites and stings, prickly heat, and other allergies that may flair up in a different environment and climate
  • Oral rehydration medicines for upset tummies
  • Mild laxatives – travel can quite often disrupt the digestive system
  • Remedies for motion sickness
  • Painkillers for children
  •  Cotton wool balls
  • Bandages, gauze, and tape
  • Insect repellent
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Lip salve

If you are likely to be heading well off the beaten bath, or visiting a country where health care is not so sanitary, you may also want to consider taking your own sterile needle kit.  This usually isn’t necessary though for most child-friendly destinations.

An empty plastic carrier bag can also be very useful for if your child suddenly feels as though they will vomit on transportation or in any their public place.

Make sure that all members of the family are covered by comprehensive travel insurance too.

Be prepared, but ultimately, enjoy your holidays!

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